Laverda SFC

The Laverda SFC was a very special bike and remains so today—it’s clearly the most sought after of all the 18,500 twins the company produced in the 70’s.

Laverda-SFC-750-martin-squires-illustration

 

The SFC moniker stands for Super Freni Competizione—“freni” means brake in Italian, and back in the day having two massive leading-shoe drum brakes was the height of technological innovation. The brakes were manufactured in-house, too, adding extra pride from Laverda, and the company named the bike after the powerful brakes. Surviving examples are few and far between. Only 549 were ever produced, and only racers were allowed to buy them direct from the factory, and only after submitting current credentials before they took one home.

Marnix Van Der Schalk, an acknowledged authority on all things Laverda has weighed in on why these bikes were so rare.“First of all, these motorcycles were built to be raced and in most cases this is what they did. In 1972 they were raced successfully both nationally and internationally, but in many cases they continued to be raced by lesser gods in the years after.”

Laverda SFC

 

Start Here: Intro 70s Italian Superbikes

The Ducati Story
Ducati 350 Mark 3-D (1968-1972)
Ducati 350 Desmo (1971-1972)
Ducati 750S (1972-1974)
Ducati 750SS (1973-1974)
Ducati 900SS (1975-1982)
Ducati Darmah (1977-1982)
Ducati MHR (1979-1984) 

The Laverda Story
Laverda 750S (1969-1970)
Laverda SF (1970-1976)
Laverda SFC (1971-1976)
Laverda Jota (1976-1983)
Laverda Montjuic (1979-1981)

The Moto Guzzi Story
Moto Guzzi V7 Telaio Rosso (1971)
Moto Guzzi V7 Sport (1971-1974)
Moto Guzzi 750S (1974-1975)
Moto Guzzi Lemans 850 (1976-1978)

The MV Agusta Story
MV Agusta 750S (1971-1974)
MV Agusta 750 America (1975-1977)
MV Agusta Magni 861

BonusThe Benelli 750 Sei
//

Illustrations: Martin Squires
Studio photography: David Genat
Bike owner: Peter Boggia, Moto Borgotaro