Ducati Darmah SD

By the mid- to late-70’s a decisive trend was driving motorcycle styling towards more angular fairings and bodywork. In this way, the Darmah was a big departure for Ducati, and it was well received when it was introduced in 1977.

Ducat-Darmah-martin-squires-illustration

Although the tiger head painted on the bike’s side panels would seem to presage the mullet machismo of the upcoming 80’s—“Rambo: First Blood” would eclipse the Darmah’s production run—the bike was actually named after a tiger in an Italian children’s book. Some rightly suggested the long, powerful, upright-riding Darmah bike was a little confused, but it was still a Desmo-equipped Ducati with 70 horsepower. And thanks to the more comfortable riding position, it could be ridden all day without throwing your back out.

It was positioned as a slightly less aggressive 900SS, fitted with a smaller carb and valve setup to improve fuel mileage and increase mid-range power. Ultimately, it was a foray into the growing Sport Touring market, even if Ducati wouldn’t come out and market it as such.

Ducati Darmah

 

Start Here: Intro 70s Italian Superbikes

The Ducati Story
Ducati 350 Mark 3-D (1968-1972)
Ducati 350 Desmo (1971-1972)
Ducati 750S (1972-1974)
Ducati 750SS (1973-1974)
Ducati 900SS (1975-1982)
Ducati Darmah (1977-1982)
Ducati MHR (1979-1984) 

The Laverda Story
Laverda 750S (1969-1970)
Laverda SF (1970-1976)
Laverda SFC (1971-1976)
Laverda Jota (1976-1983)
Laverda Montjuic (1979-1981)

The Moto Guzzi Story
Moto Guzzi V7 Telaio Rosso (1971)
Moto Guzzi V7 Sport (1971-1974)
Moto Guzzi 750S (1974-1975)
Moto Guzzi Lemans 850 (1976-1978)

The MV Agusta Story
MV Agusta 750S (1971-1974)
MV Agusta 750 America (1975-1977)
MV Agusta Magni 861

BonusThe Benelli 750 Sei
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Illustrations: Martin Squires
Studio photography: David Genat
Bike owner: Stuart Parr, The Stuart Parr Collection